Category Archives: philosophy

When bodies appear.

‘The head suffers from a certain internal pain which the physicians call migraine…It feels as if there is hammering and pounding in the head. Sound or talking is unbearable, as is light or glare’.

                        – thirteenth-century description of migraine from Bartholomaeus Anglicus, De Proprietatibus Rerum (On The Properties of Things) c.1245. Source: Faith Wallis, Medieval Medicine: A Reader (2010), p. 250.

I was reminded last week of one of my favourite books about bodies and illness. In The Absent Body Drew Leder asks a simple question: why, ‘if human experience is so rooted in the bodily, is the body so often absent from experience?’ (p.69-70).

Pain, Leder observes, makes our bodies appear to use, it reminds us of their presence. Pain ‘reorganizes our lived space and time, our relations with others and with ourselves’. Bodies that are normally silent, that we take for granted, seize our awareness at times of disturbance. Chronic pain, in particular, forces people into a constant dialogue (so often described in terms of battle) with their bodies. In the case of migraine this seizure is a deeply private one, invisible to those looking on. Leder’s book was one of the main reasons that I decided to look seriously into migraine’s history, to ask how, in different times and places, people have made sense of this often unfathomably painful intrusion of the body into their lives.

I first came across phenomenology several years ago. I am certainly no philosopher, but this way of thinking appealed because it is concerned above all with individuals’ relationships and interactions with their own surroundings. Phenomenologists recognise that people do not live in the world of rules and reasons conceived of by science, but in a much messier, more unpredictable world – the ‘lifeworld’. In his foundational book Phenomenology of Perception (1945), Maurice Merleau-Ponty described phenomenology as paying attention to “a general setting in which my body can co-exist with the world” (p.250). In another important text, The Poetics of Space (1958), Gaston Bachelard proposed analysing how people take root, day after day, in a “corner of the world” (p.4). The idea of the ‘lifeworld’ was not a new one. In 1934 Jacob von Uexküll had used the concept to explain how an animal’s existence is experienced through “meaning carriers”. These carriers of significance might include a sensitivity towards heat, or sound. Experience can also be affected by orientation, memories, preconceptions, fears and suspicions.

Pre-migraine

Debbie Ayles, ‘Pre-Migraine’. Credit: Debbie Ayles, Wellcome Images.

It is this emphasis on significance that I find most useful for thinking about the history of an illness such as migraine. This is not ‘environmental health’ in the way that we normally consider it, i.e. in terms of pollution and waste, but a much more personal and less tangible kind of relationship – in which noise, smells, light, changes in air-pressure or the phases of the moon are taken seriously.

One example of this that has stayed with me is a response to a Youtube animation of migraine aura (WARNING: this video contains black and white flashing images). In the comments posted below the video one woman described a time when she had experienced an aura while driving:

seeing multiple images such as repetitive road signs, lights from other cars coming at me while I was dizzy and not knowing if they were in my lane or not, and rays of colors shooting towards me all at the same time. Yes, I pulled over ASAP on a long, dark country road, scared to death and crying’.

People with migraine gain an acute awareness of their surroundings, As can be seen from this quote, and the excerpt I began this post with  this kind of environmental awareness has a very long history.

Leave a comment

Filed under aura, history, illness history, people, philosophy