Tag Archives: illness history

Making the Migraine Art Collection Public

Migraine Action is the national advisory and support charity for people affected by migraine, and is based just down the road from me in Leicester, UK. It provides support to individuals, families, businesses, medical professionals and support workers, with the aim to help sufferers to take control of their migraine and reduce its impact in their home life and in the workplace.

Migraine Action also holds a remarkable archive of around 550 original pieces of artwork which were produced by members of the public for four Migraine Art Competitions held between 1980 and 1987. Entrants were invited to illustrate their own impressions of visual disturbance or the effect migraine has on their everyday lives. The collection represents the work of around 450 artists, of whom three-quarters were women, and one in ten were children aged 16 and under.

Child detail

Detail of a Child’s Drawing. Reproduced with permission of Migraine Action.

Since the beginning of my project, I have wanted to include the art collection as a chapter in my book. While neurologists have considered the depictions of aura in these works to be useful in understanding something about the mechanisms of migraine, they have also dismissed the significance of the depictions of pain and lived experience. This seems wrong to me. Individually and collectively the artworks in the collection provide a vivid insight into life with pain and illness. Aesthetically many pieces of work – the hairstyles, the airbrushing, the net curtains, the cultural references – are very much a product of the 1980s, but the concerns represented by these artists often appear to be timeless. Depictions of daggers, hammers, flashing lights, pulsing veins, flames, social isolation, are as relevant now, as they were to the people who talked of migraine in the fifteenth or seventeenth centuries. But it is the images by children that I found most moving, and difficult to look at. I often wonder how a parent must have felt, after urging their child to draw a picture for the competition, but then having to see the results – their child’s view of pain, isolation and unhappiness.

As I have been working in the Migraine Action offices on my research, we have often wondered about how we could make this important collection more accessible to the public. The opportunity came earlier this year, when we successfully bid for funding from the University of Leicester REF Impact Development Fund, which aims to help researchers develop the public impact of their work.

The grant we were awarded has enabled us to employ a Research Assistant to catalogue and scan the collection, and to commission the Leicester-based social-enterprise design and communications agency We Are Epic to create a website which will give free public access to the entire collection.

The project began in earnest in early March, and the first task for Dr Steve Ling, our ReseAura detail 2Aura detail 3arch Associate, was to catalogue the entire collection. One of the most important aspects of this cataloguing has been the ‘tagging’ of images with keywords that will transfer to the website as search terms. Steve is now well into the high-resolution scanning. Seeing these images at such a large scale on the screen is wonderful, revealing the detail of every brushstroke and pen line.

Migraine detailMeanwhile, We Are Epic have been working hard on the website design. I am so excited about the ways that people will be able to search for images by theme and keyword. The website will be completed over the summer, and we hope to launch during Migraine Awareness week in September.

The historian’s research process is a long one, and it can be years before our results appear in print. This project has happened fast. It’s been so exciting to work with such an enthusiastic team on something that has such a clear and simple purpose. I can’t wait to share it with you all. More soon!

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When bodies appear.

‘The head suffers from a certain internal pain which the physicians call migraine…It feels as if there is hammering and pounding in the head. Sound or talking is unbearable, as is light or glare’.

                        – thirteenth-century description of migraine from Bartholomaeus Anglicus, De Proprietatibus Rerum (On The Properties of Things) c.1245. Source: Faith Wallis, Medieval Medicine: A Reader (2010), p. 250.

I was reminded last week of one of my favourite books about bodies and illness. In The Absent Body Drew Leder asks a simple question: why, ‘if human experience is so rooted in the bodily, is the body so often absent from experience?’ (p.69-70).

Pain, Leder observes, makes our bodies appear to use, it reminds us of their presence. Pain ‘reorganizes our lived space and time, our relations with others and with ourselves’. Bodies that are normally silent, that we take for granted, seize our awareness at times of disturbance. Chronic pain, in particular, forces people into a constant dialogue (so often described in terms of battle) with their bodies. In the case of migraine this seizure is a deeply private one, invisible to those looking on. Leder’s book was one of the main reasons that I decided to look seriously into migraine’s history, to ask how, in different times and places, people have made sense of this often unfathomably painful intrusion of the body into their lives.

I first came across phenomenology several years ago. I am certainly no philosopher, but this way of thinking appealed because it is concerned above all with individuals’ relationships and interactions with their own surroundings. Phenomenologists recognise that people do not live in the world of rules and reasons conceived of by science, but in a much messier, more unpredictable world – the ‘lifeworld’. In his foundational book Phenomenology of Perception (1945), Maurice Merleau-Ponty described phenomenology as paying attention to “a general setting in which my body can co-exist with the world” (p.250). In another important text, The Poetics of Space (1958), Gaston Bachelard proposed analysing how people take root, day after day, in a “corner of the world” (p.4). The idea of the ‘lifeworld’ was not a new one. In 1934 Jacob von Uexküll had used the concept to explain how an animal’s existence is experienced through “meaning carriers”. These carriers of significance might include a sensitivity towards heat, or sound. Experience can also be affected by orientation, memories, preconceptions, fears and suspicions.

Pre-migraine

Debbie Ayles, ‘Pre-Migraine’. Credit: Debbie Ayles, Wellcome Images.

It is this emphasis on significance that I find most useful for thinking about the history of an illness such as migraine. This is not ‘environmental health’ in the way that we normally consider it, i.e. in terms of pollution and waste, but a much more personal and less tangible kind of relationship – in which noise, smells, light, changes in air-pressure or the phases of the moon are taken seriously.

One example of this that has stayed with me is a response to a Youtube animation of migraine aura (WARNING: this video contains black and white flashing images). In the comments posted below the video one woman described a time when she had experienced an aura while driving:

seeing multiple images such as repetitive road signs, lights from other cars coming at me while I was dizzy and not knowing if they were in my lane or not, and rays of colors shooting towards me all at the same time. Yes, I pulled over ASAP on a long, dark country road, scared to death and crying’.

People with migraine gain an acute awareness of their surroundings, As can be seen from this quote, and the excerpt I began this post with  this kind of environmental awareness has a very long history.

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A fifteenth-century poem

I recently received a message from Jenni Nuttall, a Lecturer in English at Oxford University, asking whether I had come across a migraine poem by the fifteenth-century Scottish poet William Dunbar that she had written about on her own blog.

The first verse of the poem reads as follows:

On his heid-ake

My heid did yak yester nicht,
This day to mak that I na micht.
So sair the magryme dois me menyie,
Perseing my brow as ony ganyie,
That scant I luik may on the licht.

Here is the translation from Middle Scots into English (with thanks to Jenni for allowing me to use this):

My head did ache last night,
so much that I cannot  write poetry today.
So painfully the migraine does disable me,
piercing my brow just like any arrow,
that I can scarcely look at the light.

There are two more verses of the poem  in which Dunbar describes the physical pain of looking at the light and, as Nuttall observes, he also beautifully captures a sense of the migraine aftermath, or ‘postdrome’ – although Dunbar would get up the following morning, his spirit remained asleep, unable to waken for mirth or minstrelcy, revelry or dancing.

Vein man

Miniature of vein man, or a phlebotomy(blood-letting) chart, inscribed ‘Homo venorum’. British Library Egerton MS 2572 f. 50.

There is actually a suprising amount of evidence of how medieval people dealt with migraine. Images of homo venorum often included instructions for bleeding, such as this one in a fifteenth-century guild book of the York Company of Barber Surgeons.  The circle in the bottom left hand corner refers to the point between the thumb and first finger of the man’s right hand, and contains instructions in Middle English for treating ‘migram’ by opening the vein between the fingers and the thumb. The literature and imagery of phlebotomy offers some of the earliest evidence in a long history of migraine management in everyday medical practice. Other medieval treatments include a cap made of aloe, myrrh, wheat flour and poppy oil in the thirteenth-century manuscript of Causae et Curae, attributed to Hildegard of Bingen. In eleventh-century Chartres, a patient might have been told to stroke peony root over the site of pain, while a thirteenth-century Welsh text recommends eating a baked or roasted hare’s brain stuffed with rosemary flowers, followed by sleep to treat the ‘migran’. So there is evidence of medieval descriptions of migraine and of treatments, but what is so important about Dunbar’s poem is its expression of something much less tangible, of what people thought a migraine felt like in the fifteenth century.

I was delighted to finally learn of this poem, and yet Dunbar is hardly obscure: he was employed by James IV, and his migraine poem has been discussed a number of times. To my knowledge he has yet to be noticed by historians of medicine. This is a wonderful poem – in many ways it seems a staggeringly modern evocation of a migraine – and it certainly deserves to be included in our sources.

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On Migraine and the Eyes

I recently wrote a post for the Recipes Project, a wonderful collaborative blog about magic, art, food, medicine and history. I was tracing the origins of a ‘megreeme’ remedy (dated 1606) across printed and manuscript recipe collections – a trail that led through four centuries. Searching the digitised collections of the Wellcome Library’s early modern recipe collections has been one of the joys of this migraine research project – the wealth of medical, culinary and veterinary knowledge within them is astounding. There are also more than thirty remedies for migraine within these  manuscripts. From basic plasters to be laid over the head, to complex drinks that required effort and financial outlay to create but would then keep for many years, there is a real sense that many of the compilers of these precious volumes of domestic medical knowledge encountered migraine routinely, and took it seriously. So when I received a tweet asking whether visual migraines were ever mentioned, I was happy for an excuse to return to the collections again. Continue reading

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Migraine Episodes

This blog is about my search for the history of migraine, and the people who have experienced, treated and discussed this common disorder. This project covers an ambitious time span – from the fifteenth-century, to the modern-day.

There are many words for migraine in the English language; since the Roman physician, surgeon and philosopher Galen coined the term hemicrania to describe one-sided head pain in the second century, variations of this word have included emigranea, megrim, meagrom, and migraine, among others. In later centuries, we can also include sick and bilious headache. As illnesses go, it is a relatively easy one to find, particularly as more and more historical archives are digitised and the text becomes searchable. Continue reading

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