Monthly Archives: August 2015

On Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

In 1870 Elizabeth Garrett Anderson obtained her M.D. with a thesis on the history of migraine.

I’ve noticed Elizabeth Garrett Anderson popping up in my Twitter feed recently. On 29 September the Royal Society of Medicine in London are hosting ‘A celebration of Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and 150 years of medicine’, to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Elizabeth Garrett becoming a Licentiate of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries. This made her the first woman in Britain to qualify for inclusion in its Medical Register.

In 1872, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson founded the New Hospital for Women, which was also staffed by women. After her death the purpose-built premises in Euston Road were renamed in her honour. Until 1988 it remained facility run by women, for women. The building is still a prominent feature on Euston Road, now part of the UNISON Centre and housing a gallery commemorating her achievements. Continue reading

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Filed under commemoration, gender, history, people, treatments

How migraine lost its legitimacy

In May 1782, a flamboyant character graced the King’s Theatre Masquerade in London. Gliding his way past the Venetian sailor, the gentleman in a coat of two different colours, and the usual unremarkable costumes of some eight hundred attendees, the High German Doctor cut a dashing figure. He introduced himself to the gathering as ‘Le Sieur Francois de Migraine, Docteur en Medicine’. Continue reading

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Filed under illness history, legitimacy, marketplace, patients